Infrastructure QAL Week 10 – Quilt Top Assembly and Spray Basting Tutorial

How is your Infrastructure quilt coming along? Just remember, you can work at your own pace and if you are new, you can start this quilt any time! This week is quilt top assembly plus a complete basting video on YouTube. Keep reading for more….

Infrastructure Rows

Tips for Quilt Top Assembly

Once all 9 rows of Infrastructure have been sewn, it’s time to sew them together. They may look a little wavy, but if you sew each section in opposite directions, that will help eliminate some of the waviness.

If your rows are not all the same size, you can add coping strips, trim off some of the excess, or use lots of pins to ease in any fullness. Always sew with a “baggy bottom” which means sew with the longer strip on bottom and the feed dogs will help compensate. If needed, you can always go back and increase or decrease the seam allowance of some of the rows to get them all the same size.

Once the quilt top is sewn together, you want to take a “victory lap!” Sew about 1/8″ from the perimeter on both sides of the quilt to secure the edge seams from splitting open. This isn’t necessary for the top and bottom of the quilt since those are long strips of fabric without seams. When your top is finished, give it a final pressing and you are ready to baste!

Infrastucture

Basting the Quilt – Quick Overview

I baste using my design wall and 505 basting spray. I make sure my batting and batting are bigger than my quilt top and I trim away some of excess after it’s been basted. I spray the top and backing outside separately, then assemble all the layers on my design wall, taking care to smooth each layer as I go.

Once everything looks nice and flat, I’ll roughly trim the edges so that only and inch or two remain around all 4 sides. I cut off as much extra as I can to prevent it from tucking under the back and quilting the quilt to itself!!

The final basting step is to iron the quilt on both sides to set the glue and smooth everything out one final time.

Infrastructure Basting Ironing

Full length Basting Tutorial on YouTube

Here’s the complete step-by-step basting process. The total video is just under 7 minutes because I’ve sped it up in several parts so that you don’t have to watch it in real time. In reality it still didn’t take very long – only about 45 minutes from start to finish to baste my quilt.

GIVEAWAY & HEATHER’S SOLIDS VERSION

Pop over to Heather Black’s blog at Quiltachusetts to see her week 10 post, made from Benartex Superior Solids. While you are there, be sure to enter the giveaway. One lucky winner will receive some Hobbs batting – which is the same batting I used to make my quilt. My favorites are the cotton/wool blend or the 80/20 cotton poly. It’s easy to work with and makes the quilt soft and cuddly!!

Infrastructure with Hobbs Batting

Helpful Links

Sharing is Caring

Both Heather and I would love to see how you are progressing, even if you make this quilt long after the quilt along is over! Here are all the ways you can share with us:

Infrastructure Quilt using Geo Pop

Infrastructure Quilt Along Row 9

This week we are making the last row of Infrastructure quilt – can you believe it??? Row 9 features simple pieced strips and it’s another great chance to fussy cut the Geo Pop fabric if desired.

Infrastructure Row 9 Geo Pop

First I’ll walk you through the process to piece this row, then you can take a look at the bonus YouTube video I created while making this row.

Cut the Strips

You want to cut nice straight strips according to the pattern instructions on page 6. If you are fussy cutting, you’ll want multiple strips of the same fabric to be cut at the same point so that you can match up the patterns.

For my strips below, I fussy cut the Mosaic Dots print and the Diamond Pop print. The Tiny Hex print was small enough that if the pattern doesn’t match up, it will still look ok.

Infrastructure Row 9 Geo Pop fabric

Optional Pattern Matching

To match patterns, I found the same spot on the fabric and pinned it in place so that I could sew right where the design repeats. In the image below, that darker shadow in the photo is where I’ve folded over the fabric so that the pattern will be continuous.

Once I sew the seam from the backside, it won’t be noticeable on the actual quilt. The seam allowance will be larger on the back when I sew it; I’ll trim it down to 1/4″ after it’s sewn.

Infrastructure Row 9 Pattern Matching

Sew in Opposite Directions

When sewing long skinny seams, they can bow or warp out of shape. So I make sure that I switch the sewing direction to compensate. Here’s how I do it. There are 6 rows here, so I sew two pairs at a time. The first pair will have the Grey Tiny Hex fabric on top. The next two pairs of strips will be sewn with the Black Tiny Hex fabric on top.

When I join the sewn rows, I’ll continue to sew with the black fabric on top, and that will automatically switch the sewing direction each time.

Infrastructure Row 9 Geo Pop fabric

Don’t forget to sew with a shorter stitch length and press those seams open! I press each time I sew a seam so that task stays easily under control.

Row 9 Infrastructure

Bonus YouTube Video

I’ve prepared a 4 minute-long YouTube video walking you through the above steps, plus a couple of fussy cutting tips thrown in. Hopefully this will help you cut and sew long strips with ease. In this video, I’m narrating the entire time so you can follow along with what I’m doing. Be sure to subscribe to my channel. If there’s continued interest, I’ll make more videos in the future!

Click the “Play” button below to watch the video on YouTube.

 

Row 9 Finished

Row 9 is finished and now the entire quilt top is ready to assemble next week. As you prepare to join the pieced rows, check their length. You can use lots of pins to ease in any rows that aren’t exactly the same.

Infrastructure Row 9 with Geo Pop Fabric by Christa Watson for Benartex

If some of your heavily pieced rows have ended up longer than they should be, go back and stitch wider seam allowances to shrink them up. You don’t have to rip out the original seam allowance to do this. You want all of the rows to be the same size before you sew them together.

GIVEAWAY & HEATHER’S Solids VERSION

Pop over to Heather Black’s blog at Quiltachusetts to see her version of Row 9 made from Benartex Superior Solids. While you are there, be sure to enter the giveaway. One lucky winner will receive some Hobbs batting – just in time to baste your quilt!

I use Hobbs batting in all of my quilts and I’m using Hobbs 80/20 Heirloom cotton/poly for this quilt. It will give me just the right amount of loft I need it doesn’t bunch up when you quilt it.

Infrastructure with Hobbs Batting

QUICK LINKS:

Be  sure to show us your progress, too! Share on instagram #infrastructurequilt and tag us @christaquilts  and @quiltachusetts.

Infrastructure Quilt Along – Making Row 8

This week we are making Row 8  – more Anvil Blocks. This is a great catchup week because this row is cut and sewn exactly the same as Week 6 Row 6, but with different fabrics.Infrastructure Row 8 Anvil Blocks

You can follow along in the Infrastructure Quilt Pattern on pages 6 and 13 for specific instructions on making this row.

Here are the cut pieces all laid out and sewn into one Anvil block:

Geo Pop Anvil Block

I used the Tri Recs tools to cut the units to make the Triangle in a Square blocks. In case you missed it, I created a YouTube tutorial on how to make these blocks back when we were making Row 4.

Tri Recs tools

Click here to get the Tri-Recs Tools

Once the Anvil blocks are sewn, it’s easy to add spacer rows to the top and bottom of the pieced row. Here’s a tip: measure the length of your row before trimming the long strips.

One more row down, and one to go! It’s been so fun using my Geo Pop prints to make this quilt!

GIVEAWAY & HEATHER’S VERSION

Pop over to Heather Black’s blog at Quiltachusetts to see her version of Row 8 made from Benartex Superior solids. While you are there, be sure to enter the giveaway! One lucky winner will get a 6 month subscription to Make Modern Magazine – one of my faves!!

Make Modern

QUICK LINKS:

Be  sure to show us your progress, too! Share on instagram #infrastructurequilt and tag us @christaquilts  and @quiltachusetts.

Geo Pop Infrastructure

 

Infrastructure Quilt Along – Making Row 7

This week we are making Row 7 – the Fence Post blocks. You can follow along with the cutting directions on page 5 and the sewing directions on pages 12-13 of the Infrastructure Quilt Pattern.

Infrastructure Row 7

This is a simple row to put together and you can choose to fussy cut parts of the design if you wish. I didn’t worry about fussy cutting this row, but simply let the pattern design fall randomly.

Here are all my cut pieces using black, gray and yellow Geo Pop prints:

Geo Pop fabric, Infrastructure Pattern

For speed and efficiency, I like to stack up all of the units in order next to my sewing machine, and chain piece as much as possible. Here’s what it looks like with the units in position. It’s always amazing to me how much a block shrinks up once it’s sewn!

Infrastructure Row 7 sewing

I’m continuing to press my seams open as I sew them, and use a shorter stitch length so you don’t see the thread poking through the seams. Here’s a short bonus video showing how I press the seams open:

Here’s what it looks like once the complete row is sewn. I put it next to the finished row from last week and I love how it’s coming together!

Geo Pop Infrastructure

This has been such a fun quilt to put together so far. By just working on it one row at a time, it’s really easy to sew!

GIVEAWAY & HEATHER’S VERSION

Pop over to Heather Black’s blog at Quiltachusetts to see her version of Row 7 made from Benartex Superior solids. While you are there, be sure to enter the giveaway! Two lucky winners will each receive a brand new rotary cutter from Olfa. I use the Olfa brand from all my cutting and I love how their cutters look and feel. It makes the job so much easier!!

QUICK LINKS:

Share on instagram #infrastructurequilt

Here’s how my rows look so far, They are bit wrinkly and wonky on my design wall because I put them up in a hurry, and an un-quilted top is always flimsy and unfinished looking. I can’t wait to sew the top together! Just two more rows to go!!

Infrastructure In Progress

 

Infrastructure QAL Week 6 – Cutting and Sewing Row 6

This week we are making Row 6 – the Anvil Blocks. This row is super simple because we are making more Triangle in a Square blocks using the Tri-Recs tools. Follow along in the Infrastructure quilt pattern on page 5 for the cutting instructions, and on page 12 for the sewing instructions.

Infrastructure Row 6

So this time, I’m using the yellow Tiny Hex print in yellow for the anvil blocks and Op Squares charcoal for the background.

Geo Pop fabric yellow blackClick here to purchase Geo Pop fabric by the yard.

If you missed my video tutorial on how to make these fun and versatile blocks, click here for a refresher when I made row 4 – diamond blocks.

Here are all of my cut out units to make  the anvil blocks.

Infrastructure Row 6 cutting

When sewing the units, don’t forget to stitch with a shorter stitch length and press seams open to keep the blocks nice and flat.

The Anvil block is made from two Triangle in a Square blocks with a square in between:

Anvil Units

Here’s the finished row!

Infrastructure quilt

Watch It on YouTube!

Heres a quick 1 minute youtube video showing the stepouts above plus a little bit of the sewing. I’ve been practicing how to make YouTube videos along with making this quilt. This week I learned how to add voiceover to my videos.It’s been fun to learn a new editing skill each week!

Quick Links:

If you need to catch up, this row goes together super fast and it’s actually the same row repeated again for row 8 – so feel free to work ahead if you want!

Share on instagram #infrastructurequilt

GIVEAWAY & HEATHER’S VERSION

Pop over to Heather Black’s blog at Quiltachusetts to see her version of Row 6 made from Benartex Superior solids. While you are there, be sure to enter the giveaway. I’m the sponsor this week and one lucky winner will get a strip-roll of my Geo Pop + a fun jelly roll quilt pattern: Surplus Strips! You can color block it like I did, or use up your leftover (surplus) precut strips!

Surplus Strips Quilt Pattern by Christa Watson of Christa Quilts

Geo Pop Strip Roll

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just 3 more rows to sew and we’ll start putting the finishing touches on this quilt – I can’t wait!!

Infrastructure Quilt Pattern

 

 

Infrastructure Quilt Along Week 5: Sewing Row 4

This week for the Infrastructure quilt along, we are sewing Row 4 which looks a bit intimidating, but it really isn’t. True, it does have a lot of piecing, but it’s a great opportunity to play with fun shapes.Infrastructure Row 4You can fussy cut your fabric so that the patterns match up if you want, but it’s certainly not necessary. My #1 tip for cutting this row is to use the Tri-Recs Ruler set. The Infrastructure quilt pattern includes full size templates, but honestly, it’s faster and easier to use the specialty rulers.

Tri Recs tools

Click here to get the Tri-Recs ruler set.

Follow along in the quilt pattern on pages 4, 6-7 and 10-11 to make Row 4. It’s sewn from Triangle in a Square blocks, fussy cut squares and background fabric.

Triangle in a Square Blocks

Here’s a video tutorial on how to cut and sew Triangle in a Square blocks using the Tri-Recs Ruler set. It’s 11 minutes long and walks you through the entire process, so click below to watch the entire thing. If you’d like more videos, be sure to subscribe to my YouTube Channel!

Full Color step-by-step diagrams with exact measurements to make each row are given in the pattern.

I chose to the fussy cut the squares of green Mosaic Dots, but not the background fabric.

Fussy Cut Squares

And here’s a closeup of finished row after it’s been sewn together:

Infrastructure Row 4

This row was a little more cutting and piecing, but the results are well worth it!

GIVEAWAY & HEATHER’S VERSION

Pop over to Heather Black’s blog at Quiltachusetts to see her version of Row 4 made from Benartex Superior solids. Heather is actually our prize sponsor this week and she’s offering 2 lucky winners a Tri-Recs tool set + 2 of her patterns that also use this shape. Aren’t they fab??

Heather Black Patterns

Heather is such an amazing pattern designer and longarm machine quilter and I can’t wait until the final reveal of her quilt! After all, she designed both versions of Infrastructure (solids and Geo Pop prints) and I  can’t wait to see what she comes up with next!Infrastructure in Solids by Heather Black

Heather’s recoloring of Infrastructure using all solids.

Important Links:

Infrastructure Row 4 Finished

Infrastructure Week 4: Pieced Strip Rows 3 and 5

How is your Infrastructure quilt coming along? To recap, so far we’ve finished sewing rows 1 and 2 which included a lot of cutting and piecing. Scroll to the end for links to the previous QAL posts.Infrastructure Quilt Pattern

If your pieced rows aren’t exactly the same length, don’t worry.
When we join all the rows together in week 10, I’ll discuss how to fix that, so stay tuned!

So this week will be a nice break. We will be sewing rows 3 and 5 which are basically just sewing together long strips of fabric. It’s super fast and easy!

Infrastructure Row 3Infrastructure Row 5

Cutting the Rows

Instructions for cutting and sewing rows 3 and 5 can be found in the Infrastructure Quilt Pattern on pages 4-5, 9, and 11.

The most important thing to do when sewing together long strips of fabric is to measure what the cut size should be, and pining as you join the strips. If you don’t measure or pin, you have a good chance of creating “friendly” strip sets – in other words, long sewn segments that “wave” at you, LOL!! Friendly, wavy strips will make it hard for your quilt to lay flat, so let’s stick with being friendly to each other, not with our fabric, ok??

Geo Pop Strips

My strips are all cut from the  Infrastructure Quilt Kit.

You can either cut these strips from a larger piece of fabric, parallel to the selvage; or enough width of fabric strips (usually 40″-42″) and piecing them together, then trim to size. When sewing 2 strips together to get a longer length, sew with a straight seam (not a mitered one) so that you’ll have enough length. Also, be sure to measure your other pieced rows and double check that you are cutting your long skinny strips the same unfinished size.

Mosaic Dots from Geo Pop

This is the Mosaic Dots print from Geo Pop – my fave!!!
Each circle is about 2″ in diameter.

You can choose to fussy cut the center of row 3 if you want, or let it be random. You can also choose to match up the pattern if you like. It’s not to hard too match the pattern – just pin and sew where the fabric repeats so the seam is less noticeable. Then trim off the extra fabric to 1/4″ seam allowance.

For my quilt, I fussy cut the center of row 3, but didn’t fussy cut any of the other strips since they were much skinnier. Refer to the QAL post from week 2 for tips on fussy cutting.

Sewing the Rows

To keep the long skinny strips for warping or stretching out of shape, sew the seams in opposite directions. An easy way to do this is to sew with the same fabric on top. So take a look at Row 3 below and notice the directions of the arrows:

Sewing DirectionSewing directions of each seam to prevent warping or bowing

If you sew with the black strip on top when sewing both long skinny strips to the center, you will automatically switch sewing directions as indicated by the arrows. You can also achieve the same result if you keep the center strip on top instead, sewing sewing both long seams. The choice is up to you!

Use the same technique with Row 5 and sew either with (1) the white strip on top for both seams or (2) the blue strip on top for both seams (even if it’s a slightly different fabric).

Switch Sewing Directions

Here’s a short, 1 minute video of me sewing the long skinny strips. I always start and end each sewing session with a scrap of fabric to catch stray threads. This prevents making a huge mess of thread on the back when you start sewing.

And there you have it – 2 more rows of our Infrastructure quilt!

Infrastructure Quilt Rows 3 and 5

GIVEAWAY & HEATHER’S VERSION

Pop over to Heather Black’s blog at Quiltachusetts to see her version of rows 3 and 5 made from Benartex Superior solids. While you are there, enter this week’s giveaway: an Accuquilt Go! Me Kit & Triangle Dies. You can also find out who won last week’s prize and remember, there’s a new fabulous prize each and every week from one of our sponsors!

Relevant Links:

Infrastructure Quilt

Infrastructure Quilt, designed by Heather Black and Made by Christa Watson

Free Patterns to Make Using Geo Pop Strip Rolls

Are you a precut lover like me? Now that my next line of fabric, Geo Pop has been released, one of my most often asked questions is – what can I make with a Geo Pop strip roll? So today I thought it would be fun to revisit 3 of my free jellyroll patterns, all recolored in Geo Pop.

Geo Pop Strip Roll

Click here to get the Geo Pop strip roll: (40 – 2 1/2″ x 42″ strips)

The Jolly Jelly Roll QuiltJolly Jellyroll quilt in Geo Pop by Christa Watson

Click here for the Jolly Jelly Roll quilt along.

This was the very first quilt along I published on my blog, waaaay back in 2012! Although I never wrote up a formal pattern for it, you can follow the quilt along links to make this quilt from start to finish. All you need is one Geo Pop roll + 1 yard of Tiny Hex black for inner border and binding. Now I want to drop everything and remake this quilt!!

Beaded Lanterns

Geo Pop Beaded Lanterns by Christa WatsonClick here for the free Beaded Lanterns quilt pattern.

This is a free pattern I created to promote a previous fabric line (Fandangle), but I loved recoloring it in Geo Pop! I can’t decide which I like best – using the white or black Op Squares print for the background. Which would you choose??

For this pattern jelly roll pattern, it only uses 36 out of the 40 precut strips so that one of the fabrics from the unused prints can be used for the background. All you need is 1 Geo Pop strip roll + 3 yards of contrasting white or black.

Modern Puzzle

Modern Puzzle Quilt

Click here for the free Modern Puzzle quilt pattern

I created this free pattern to showcase my first fabric line, Modern Marks. Although the Modern marks strip rolls have long since sold out, you can also make this quilt using fat quarters of either collection. Above, I’ve paired up a strip roll of Geo Pop with 3 yards of light gray background so that all of the colors sparkle! (Hint: this gray is actually from a future fabric line, so stay tuned!!)

Just remember: if you have any questions while making any quilts from my books, patterns, or tutorials I’m always here to help you out! Be sure to tag me on instagram @christaquilts and share pics of your progress in my ChristaQuilts Facebook group. I can’t wait to see them!

Infrastructure Quilt Along: Cutting and Sewing Row 2

This week we are working on Row 2 of Infrastructure Quilt Along which is making Fast Flying Geese. The basic unit is the same for all 3 colors of row 2, and I use a method called “4 at a time” that leaves very little waste and works perfectly, no matter what size units you need to make.

Infrastructure Fast Flying Geese

You need to make a total of 15 geese, which means you’ll have one of each left over which you can always sew into something else. Refer to page 4 (Row 2) of the Infrastructure Quilt Pattern for the correct size squares to cut, then follow the step outs below to make your geese.

I didn’t worry about fussy cutting any fabric in this row because the prints are pretty small scale to begin with and I especially love how the Op Squares print looks when it’s cut randomly.

Geo Pop Infrastructure Squares

So I used 3 different fabrics from Geo Pop to make the color gradation: Op Squares in Orange and Red, and Tiny Hex in Orange. I paired them up with Tiny Hex Gray for the background. If you wanted to go wild and crazy, you could make scrappy geese in similar colors. You could even use the same fabric for all of the geese if you wanted to tone it down – the choice is up to you!

With these highly geometric prints, I’m not at all worried about the direction of the design so I’m not trying to keep the gray background squares going all the same way.

Sewing Fast Flying Geese

Follow the instructions in the pattern on pages 8-9. I’ve shared step-by-step pics of the process below:

Two smaller squares are placed on top of one larger colorful square, right sides together, so that the marked lines match up.  You’ll be sewing on both sides of the marked line, 1/4″ away. For speed and efficiency, I like to chain piece by sewing all of one side of the units, and then all of the other side of the units.

Geo Pop Infrastructure

Once the seams are sewn, cut all sewn square units on the drawn line and press the seams so that you have a bunch of funky looking shapes that sort of look like a heart. Remember – I like to stitch with a shorter stitch length (2.0 instead of my machine’s default of 2.5) and press my seams open so they are nice and flat!

Infrastructure Geo Pop

Add another smaller gray square to the opposite side, and then sew on both sides of the marked line. Again, repeat for all of the units you are making.

Infrastructure with Geo Pop

Once you cut the unit on the marked line, you’ll have two complete flying geese units! Press the seams and trim off the dog ears. Notice in the picture below, the top flying geese unit hasn’t yet been cleaned up. The bottom one is ready to sew into the larger triple-geese unit.

Fast Flying Geese

Once you’ve sewn all of the geese units, group them into sets of 3 and join the three units together to create one pieced geese segment. I always press after the end of each round of sewing to keep my work nice and flat as I go.

Triple Geese in Geo Pop

When joining the geese, be sew to sew right through the point at the tip so they line up correctly. I’ve put a pin next to the point in the image below:

Fast Flying Geese Point

Pin generously and sew in opposite directions to keep the long pieced row from warping out of shape. Here’s what a section of it looks like with all of the seams pressed open:

Seams Pressed Open

Join all of the triple geese units to complete Row 2 of Infrastructure.

Finished Flying Geese

Here’s a quick video tutorial basically going over everything I wrote above:

Next week will be a bit of a break. We will be sewing two of the long strip rows together which will be easy peazy!! So if you are just starting, or haven’t even begun, not to worry – we are taking it nice and easy so you can sew along on your own schedule!

Geo Pop Infrastructure Geese

Giveaway & Heather’s Version

Pop over to Heather Black’s blog at Quiltachusetts to see her version and enter this week’s giveaway: a 6 month subscription to Make Modern Magazine!!

Make Modern

OTHER IMPORTANT LINKS

Fast Flying Geese

Don’t forget to share your progress! Tag us on Instagram @christaquilts  and @quiltachusetts and use the search hashtag #infrastructurequilt in your post so others can see, too! You can also share pics and ask questions in my Facebook group.

More Geo Pop Project Inspiration!

It’s been so fun to see quilts and other projects made from Geo Pop literally “popping” up online! Here a just a few that have caught my eye that I’d love to share with you. If you make something be sure to share it in my Facebook group or use the hashtag #geopopfabric on instagram.

City Limits pattern by Everday Stitches

City Limits by Everyday StitchesCity Limits by Everyday Stitches

Click here to get the City Limits Quilt Pattern from Everyday Stitches

This bold, modern design was created by Jenifer Dick of Everyday Stitches. She, along with her partner Trisch Price won the best new exhibitor booth at Quilt Market last spring and I’m thrilled that they chose to include this pattern in their lineup of new releases. City Limits is made from fat quarters sorted in pairs by colorway with a bit of solid accent fabric. I love how well they showcased the Geo Pop fat quarters in this quilt!

Color Weave Quilt in Geo Pop

Color Weave Geo PopClick here to get the Color Weave Quilt Pattern
Click here to get the Geo Pop fat quarter bundle

I came across this amazing version of my Color Weave pattern made by @alilymimi on Instagram and instantly fell in love. She cut the strips from Geo Pop fat quarters rather than  using a precut roll because you need 2 strips each of 17 different colors. Geo Pop is a larger line at 25 prints so there’s not enough in the strip roll to get 2 of each. (But you could also make it scrappy, too!!) I think I might even like this better than the original version!!

Modern X in Geo Pop

I recently had a bit of fun myself, digitally recoloring some older patterns in EQ8 using my newer fabrics. one of my early best selling patterns is Modern X (and currently on sale). I thought it would be fun to remake it using the black, white, gray and yellow prints in Geo Pop. One of these days I would LOVE to remake it, so please let me know which version below you like best:Modern X in Geo Pop

Modern X in Geo Pop

Modern X in Geo Pop

Click here to get the Modern X quilt pattern (on sale!)
Click here to get yardage of Geo Pop

Blooming Wallflowers in Geo Pop

I once heard that the mark of a great quilt pattern is that it looks good no matter which fabrics you choose, so I keep that in mind when designing. I also had fun imagining what a remake of Blooming Wallflowers would look like in Geo Pop, so here’s the version I came up with:

Geo Pop Blooming Wallflowers

Click here to get the background print – Op Squares Charcoal by the yard.

Then I saw this amazing version being made as a class sample by Vickie Arnold for Blue Bar quilts in Wisconsin. They’ll be stocking the fabric & pattern and will be offering a class on how to make it soon, so if you are in their local area – be on the lookout for that!! 🙂

Blooming Wallflowers in Geo Pop

Geo Pop Color Wheel Clutch by Sue O’Very

I love it when other creatives sew “3-D” items too, instead of just flat 2-D quilts! My talented friend Sue O’Very created this amazing Color Wheel clutch using a striking black/gray/yellow Geo Pop combo plus some cork fabric! She’ll even be teaching this as a class at a major quilt show soon, so be sure to follow her for all the details!

Color Wheel Clutch in Geo Pop

Click her for Sue O’Very’s Color Wheel Clutch Sew Along!

That’s just a taste of what you can make from Geo Pop! Check out the hashtag #geopopfabric on instagram for more fun ideas. I know I will!!