Bling Quilt Along Part 5 – Binding to Finish and Ta-Da It’s Done!!

Have you been enjoying following along to make Bling? Scroll to the end for links to the entire quilt along. This week we will be binding our Bling to finish it up!

Bling Quilts with Geo Pop

Roundup of binding tutorials

Because I pretty much bind my quilts all the same way (either by hand or machine), I have a LOT of binding tutorials that I’ve shared over the years. So here are 3 for you to try – use whichever method you like best!

Bonus Binding Tips

When I first began my binding adventures, I cut my strips 2 1/4″ wide. However, that meant that if I attached my binding with 1/4″ seams, it would be bigger on the back than the front. So over the last couple of years, I’ve started cutting my strips 2″ wide and that gives me a more even finish on both sides.

To avoid ending up with a seam in the corner, I will roughly “walk” my binding around the quilt and if any seams fall in the corners, I will adjust the whole binding by and inch or two before I start sewing. If worse comes to worse and I STILL get a seam on the corner, I’ll simply cut off part of the binding and sew a new seam to move it!

Homework

Finish quilting and binding your version of Bling and share it in my ChristaQuilts Facebook Group. I can’t wait to see your fabulous finish!

Bling Quilt Pattern by Christa Watson

QUILT ALONG LINKS

Bling Quilts White or Black

Bling Finished Stats

  • Finished size: 67″ x 83″
  • Designed using Electric Quilt 8 software
  • Pieced and quilted by Christa Watson on my Bernina 770QE
  • Fabric collection: Geo Pop by Christa Watson for Benartex
  • Pattern: Bling  by Christa Watson
  • Batting used: Hobbs Cotton/Wool
  • Thread used: Aurifil 50 weight cotton in black/white variegated and bright pink
  • Quilting designs: wavy grid (white) and straight line grid (black)
  • Completed: May of 2019

Bling Quilt Along Part 4: Machine Quilting Option 2: Wavy Grid

This week I’m super excited to give you additional options for machine quilting your Bling quilt. I quilted both of my versions with two different walking foot quilting designs. Last week, I shared my basting tutorial along with option 1; and I wanted to add one more plug for pressing your seams open:

When you press your seams open, not only will the quilt lie flat and make it much easier to quilt, but you wan’t get any “shadowing” of the seams, which is when a darker fabric shows up under a lighter fabric seam. The darker fabric always goes to the darker side, and the lighter fabric always goes to the lighter side.

But here’s a bonus tip when working with lighter background fabrics such as in this version of Bling: be sure to clip off any excess darker threads underneath so you don’t see them from the front of the quilt. If this does happen, you can always use a needle or tiny crochet hook to grab any pesky threads that show underneath the quilt top.

Machine Quilting Wavy Grid

To recap both both machine quilting options mentioned in the Bling quilt pattern, check out this short video below which shows me quilting wavy lines on the white version and a straight-line grid on the black version:

Check out more fun tutorials on my YouTube channel.

The basic idea for either quilting plan is to “divide and conquer” – quilt one pass of lines in both directions all the way across the quilt. Then quilt additional passes across the quilt until you like the density. You can do this with straight lines, or irregular wavy lines. I’ve even used a decorative stitch on my sewing machine using the same process!

Choosing Thread

For the white version of Bling, I went with a more subtle thread than the hot pink I chose for the black version. I like to take a picture of the thread I’m using on the quilt so I can document it to know which one I used. This black/white/gray thread is included in my Variegated Thread Collection from Aurifil. 

I prefer to quilt with 50 weight, 100% cotton thread from Aurifil.

1st pass across the quilt

So let me break it down for you a little bit in photos. In the first pass across the quilt, you can barely see any quilting. I’m quilting an organic wavy line “near” the ditch rather than “in” the ditch and it really blends in. The lines are really widely spaced apart, in between each of the block rows.

Click the image above to enlarge. Can you spot the quilting lines?

To quilt wavy lines, my machine is set up for regular straight line stitching, but I gently move the quilt from side to side to form the organic looking wavy lines.

2nd pass across the quilt

The next quilting pass is roughly through the center of the blocks. I use the seam lines as a guide for where to quilt. The wavy lines are fast and easy to quilt because you can eyeball where you are going and the lines don’t have to be perfectly spaced.

It helps to have a large work surface and a drop in table to hold the weight of the quilt.

The wavy lines are actually must faster, and it’s my go-to design when I’m in a hurry! In fact, by quilting wavy lines “near” the ditch, instead of “in” the ditch, it’s a great choice when your ditches (seams) don’t line up perfectly.

Quilt in both directions

To keep the wavy grid as evenly spaced as possible, you will want to quilt in both directions – horizontally and vertically with each pass. Just rotate the quilt in the direction you need to go!

Now the yummy quilted texture is starting to appear!!
Just remember, the more lines you quilt, the less your imperfections will show!

use the seamlines as a guide

Here’s a really good example where you can see how I lined up the wavy lines with the pieced seams in both directions. The block design is a little off center so the lines aren’t all evenly spaced, but that’s hardly noticeable. This allows me to avoid marking because much easier to eyeball the wavy lines rather than straight ones.

Keep Quilting more lines!

By the time I’m finished, my lines will be quilted about 3/4″ to 1″ apart in both directions. This is completely a personal preference and it’s up to you how dense you’d like to quilt. Just remember, if you are using natural fiber materials (ie cotton fabric, cotton thread, cotton batting), the quilt will NOT get stiff the more you quilt it. And the more you love it, use it and wash it, the softer it will become!

I eventually lost track of how many passes I quilted, but I kept going until I liked the results!

Additional QAl resources for Bling

Bling Quilt Along Part 3: Machine Quilting Option 1 – Random Crosshatch Quilting

And now we get to my favorite part of making a quilt – machine quilting! Because I made two versions of Bling, and quilted them with 2 different walking foot quilting designs, I’m excited to share both options with you over the next 2 weeks. And the best part is, you can use these tips and tricks on ANY quilt you wish to make.

Bling Quilt

For the version of Bling with the Black background, I used my walking foot/dual feed to quilt straight-“ish” lines in a crosshatch pattern following the design of the blocks.

Choose Your Thread Color

Because I wanted the thread to stand out on this vibrant colorful quilt, I chose a bright pink from my Piece and Quilt Collection – Colors from Aurifil Thread.

Piece and Quilt Colors by Christa Watson

I chose the bright pink which is the first column, third row down in the image above.
Click here to get this thread box for just $99 while supplies last.

But, before you dive into quilting your quilt, first you need to baste it. I use the same method to baste ALL of my quilts: spraying 505 adhesive on the wrong side of the quilt top and backing outdoors or in a well-ventilated area.

Prepping the Quilt

Bling quilt in progress

Then, I assemble the quilt layers together on my design wall indoors. You can also use a table if you don’t have a design wall.

Bling quilt in progressBasting in process on my design wall.
I can’t wait to share more about the quilting of this version of Bling next week!

The “magic” part of my spray-basting method is ironing the basted quilt on both sides – front and back to squish it all together and set the glue.

Iron the basted quilt to set the glue

Get the Bling kit – in white or black – while supplies last!

Click the image below to watch a super speedy basting video from my Infrastructure quilt.

Once you have basted your quilt and are ready to begin machine quilting, be sure to clean and oil your machine and put in a fresh needle.

I really like the Superior brand Titanium needs in size 80/12 to go along with my 50 weight cotton Aurifil thread.

Click here to get some of my favorite notions and thread.

 

 

 

Make a Quilting Plan

In all of my quilt patterns, I like to include quilting suggestions and a quilting plan. It’s very easy to “divide” and conquer the straight line quilting by first quilting in the ditch between each of the blocks in both directions. This will create a grid that’s equal to the size of the quilt blocks. This will anchor or stabilize your quilt for additional quilting.

Bling Quilting Plan

One of the quilting plans included in the Bling quilt pattern.

Once you have anchored your quilt, you can quilt lines randomly across the quilt in both directions. You can quilt as light or as dense as you would like.

At first I thought I would quilt my quilt more densely, but once I quilted a few passes in both directions, I was happy with how it looked so I stopped. That’s the beauty of “divide and conquer” when it comes to quilting. You can stop whenever it feels finished!

Bling machine quilting detail

Here’s a bonus tip: if you want your lines to stay straight, but you don’t have seam lines to follow, use a piece of painter’s tape as your guide.

YouTube Quilting Videos

I have a super short video below where you can see how I used the tape while quilting this version of Bling, plus a sneak peek of how I quilted the white version, too:

If you would like to quilt your quilt more densely, continue quilting lines in both directions, one pass at a time until you like how it looks. You can see a densely quilted version of random crosshatch on my Color Weave quilt.

View the youtube video play list below. It’s a series of shorter videos strung together while quilting my Color Weave quilt. (Click here to get the Color Weave quilt pattern):

Now I can’t wait to see how you quilt yours! Keep sharing your makes with me on instagram #blingquilt and in my ChristaQuilts Facebook group.

Bling Machine Quilting Detail

Quilt Along Links

Bling Quilt Along Part 2: Sewing the Quilt Top

How are your Bling quilt blocks coming along? Be sure to see the end of this post for links to the introductory post and QAL schedule if you are just getting started!

Bling Blocks

I love a stack of freshly pressed blocks!!

If you are following along and arranging the blocks as shown on the pattern cover, you’ll want to sew your sets of bling blocks into 4’s like my pics below.

Geo Pop Bling

Geo Pop Bling blocks with Op Squares white background

At this point, don’t worry where each fabric goes. I think it’s more fun to let the blocks be random than trying to overthink it too much.

Geo Pop BlingGeo Pop Bling blocks with Tiny Hex Black background

In the Bling quilt pattern, I’ve given 4 more layout ideas for you to explore if you wish. There are plenty more iterations you can try depending on how much you rotate each block!

Bling Alternate layouts

Sewing “Homework”

Your homework this week is to finish your blocks and sew them into larger groupings of 2’s or 4’s, then sew those into rows. If you get that far and are feeling gung ho – go ahead and finish up your “flimsy” (aka unquilted top).

Bling Quilt Top in Progress

In the versions above and below, I’ve sewn my blocks into random groups of four according to the orientation on the front pattern cover. I’m using my design wall to lay out the larger blocks into a pleasing arrangement.

Black Bling Blocks

Bonus Tips!

I try to speed things up as efficiently as I can. I’ll chain piece by sewing pairs of blocks together without clipping threads in between, and I give myself plenty of room to work. I’ll also take a pic of my final layout with my phone so I can refer to it as I sew each row.

Bling Blocks in progress

I’m enjoying see the progress of those who share on instagram (#blingquilt) and in my ChristaQuilts facebook group!

Helpful Links

Bling Quilt Along Part 1: Cutting and Sewing the Blocks

It’s Bling quilt along time – whoo hoo!! This quilt is so fun and fast to make you’ll want to sew more than 1! We will move through this quilt along quickly – but just remember, these posts will stay up indefinitely, so you can refer back to them anytime.

Bling Quilts with Geo Pop

Bling on display in my Geo Pop quilt market booth a few seasons ago.

Whether you want to follow along and make this quilt IRL (in real life) or just virtually in your head, I’m excited to share tips and tricks over the next 5 weeks that will help you make better quilts, no matter which quilt pattern you are sewing. So let’s get started!!!

Bling Cutting Options

Geo Pop fabric for Bling quilt by Christa Watson of Christa Quilts

Above is all of the cut units for Bling made from Geo Pop with Tiny Hex black background.

Start by cutting your fat quarters into subunits as listed in the Bling quilt pattern on page 2. I’m making the twin size, but follow along by cutting the number of units as indicate for your size (lap, twin, queen).

Below is all of the cut units for Bling made from Geo Pop with Op Squares white background.

Geo Pop Fabric for Bling Quilt by Christa Watson

You can use all of the same background fabric as shown in my pictures above, or you can go scrappy if you wish (see other color ideas here). Just remember to cut out the correct number of total pieces as listed in the pattern for your size.

Bling in Good Vibes

For example, if you want a scrappy background version shown above, you can cut out each block background from a different low volume print. In my example, I used half yard bundles of Good Vibes in low volume and saturated prints to get this look, but you could use up lots of scraps this way, too.

Be sure to pair up the “legs” of your block units if you want them to match (but they certainly don’t have to). You can even mix up the backgrounds within each block to go “super” scrappy, too. Just remember – the choice is up to you because you are the boss of your quilt!

Thread Options

I prefer to sew with a shorter stitch length (2.0 instead of 2.5) and press ALL seams open so my blocks lie nice and flat. Sewing with a shorter stitch also prevents the seams from splitting open, and it makes it harder to see the thread in between the seams.

Aurifil Thread and Geo Pop fabric

I used up lots of leftover thread in making these quilts. I prefer to piece and quilt with Aurifil 50 weight cotton, and I used up lots of leftover bobbins since this was such a colorful quilt!

I used lighter colored piecing threads for the version with the white background, and darker threads for the version with the black background. Aurifil Thread and Geo Pop Fabric

Whenever I’m making a scrappy, colorful quilt, I’l try to use up as many spools as possible that just have a little bit of thread left on them.  Who says you have to use the same exact color of thread throughout? I love finishing up a spool of thread – don’t you??

Block Sewing Options

Follow the pattern instructions on pages 2-3 to create the basic Bling block below. I recommend sewing one block first, to make sure it turns out correctly, then chain piecing a whole bunch of units at once for speed and efficiency.

Bling Block

The fun part about making this block is mixing up the different fabric combinations. There’s no right or wrong way to pair them up. Just go for it and don’t over think it!!

Below is the back side of one of my blocks with those nice flat seams. This will make quilting sooooooo much easier, because the quilt top will be smooth and flat in the end.

Bling Block White

If you’d like to be a bit adventurous, here are a couple of bonus ideas on how you can sew your block units:

In the option below, I’ve rotated the position of the rectangle units.

Geo Pop Bling

Here’s what the blocks above will look like (in the white version) if you repeat this option throughout the entire quilt. The math and number of blocks is all the same, but what a huge variation one small change will create!!

Bling Alternate Blocks

Here’s another option to try: go super scrappy by using 3 prints in each block, rather than 2. Again, there’s not much thinking involved in this change.

Sew all of the rectangle units first (see the Bling pattern, page 2) and then decide if you want to make coordinating or super scrappy blocks. Or maybe a mix of both!

Geo Pop Bling

You can also try the other extreme: using all of the same print for the main part of the block!

Isn’t it fun to have choices????

Bling block same fabric

Whichever way you choose to sew your blocks – they will look fabulous!

Homework: Sew all of the Bling Blocks

Quilty “homework” is the best kind of homework!! Now that you have several options to try, work on sewing all of your Bling blocks this week. Don’t worry if you fall behind – just work on a few blocks a day, and you’ll have them done in no time!

Bling Blocks

Remember, I’m here to help and cheer you on – even after the quilt along is over. Check out the resources below to help enhance your quilt along experience:

Additional Resources

Bling Quilt Along Supply List and Schedule

It’s time for another quilt along – whoo hoo! Be sure to head over to my Quilt Along page for links to any of the quilt alongs you may have missed in the past! Who’s ready to make Bling with me???

Click here to get the optional Bling Quilt Kit while supplies last.

Bling Quilt - Geo Pop Fabric by Christa Watson

You can make this fun colorful quilt using 20 fat quarters + 4 yards of background fabric. Make it with a rich black background as shown above, or a crisp white as shown below. For other fun color combos – check out my Bling Color Inspiration post.

Bling Quilt with Geo Pop fabric by Christa Watson

All you need to join this quilt along is a copy of the quilt pattern and a can-do attitude! I will be showing how to make the Twin size in this quilt along, but you can make any of the sizes listed in the quilt pattern.

Bling Quilt Pattern by Christa Watson

Bling Quilt Pattern by Christa Watson

QUILT ALONG SCHEDULE

The links below will go live as each part is posted. Bookmark this page and refer back to the schedule anytime in the future to work on this quilt at your own pace. The first part – cutting will begin next week on Monday, July 20th, so gather your supplies and get ready to sew!

 

Quilt in Progress on Design Wall

Share Your Work

If you’d like to share your progress, and get extra help from me and other quilt along enthusiasts, be sure to join my ChristaQuilts Facebook Group. It’s a great way to stay motivated! In fact, once you gather your supplies, be sure to share pics of the fabrics you’ll be working with. The best part of any quilt along is seeing how varied all of the quilts turn out to be!

So who’s in??? All you have to do is follow right here on the blog each week as I post the next step. I’ve even got a few videos of the machine quilting when we get to that part – I can’t wait!

The Making of Bling Quilt Part 4 of 4 – Machine Quilting

I’m back to share the final step of making my Bling quilts that I starting telling you about last month. Check out the links below to catch up on the previous posts.Bling Quilts with Geo Pop

Whenever I make the same quilt twice, I like to show different fabric combos and machine quilting ideas. I quilted both versions of Bling using a walking foot but with two very different designs. I always make a quilting plan so I know what I’m doing before I get there.

Here are two suggested quilting plans that I included in the Bling Pattern:

Random Crosshatch quilting

Random Crosshatch Quilting

Wavy Grid Quilting

Wavy Gird Quilting

Both techniques are basically the same: you quilt a series of lines across the quilt in both directions, starting with widely spaced lines, and then filling in the gaps with more lines until you like how dense the quilting is. The only difference is that the first version uses straight lines, and the second version uses wavy lines.

Here’s a short video I’ve put together with two 30 second snippets of me quilting each quilt, using the dual feed on my BERNINA, which works just like a walking foot.

These are super simple, fast and fun designs to quilt and are my go-to’s when I’m in a hurry!

Here are two other helpful tutorials in order for you to make a complete quilt. I use these same methods, no matter which quilt I’m making:

And here are the finished quilts! I have quilt kits available for both versions if you’d like to make them just like this. Because they have a scrappy look, no two quilts will be the same!

Bling Quilt - Geo Pop Fabric by Christa WatsonBling Quilt with Geo Pop fabric by Christa Watson

Sharing is Caring

Remember – I love to see you work and I know others do, too! So share pics of your progress on instagram with the hasthtag #blingquilt and be sure to tag me @christaquilts. You can also post pics, ask questions, and get any type of quilting advice over in my ChristaQuilts Facebook group. I love virtual show ‘n tell, don’t you??

Bling Quilt Part 3 of 4 – Making the Quilt Top

Now it’s time to take those yummy cut up pieces from Geo Pop and sew them together into a quilt! Although I’m making two versions of Bling at the same time, it’s really not that much extra effort to do double the amount of sewing! This is a quick overview of my process – please purchase a copy of the Bling quilt pattern for more detailed instructions.

Geo Pop Cutting in Progress
Bling Fabric Cutting in process

Cutting in progress for both version of Bling – in black or white

Geo Pop Fabric

Click here to get Geo Pop fabrics, kits, precuts and coordinating patterns.

Thread Tips

When choosing thread for piecing, I prefer to use Aurifil 50 weight cotton from one of my 3 thread collections. When sewing with lots of colorful prints like Geo Pop, I’ll choose a lighter color when sewing with the light background, and darker colors when sewing with the dark background. I’ll use the same color in top and bobbin or similar shades.

Aurifil Thread and Geo Pop Fabric

Because these quilts were so colorful, I was able to use up some leftover spools and bobbins while piecing. I sew with a shorter stitch length (2.0 instead of 2.5) and I press my seams open so that everything will lie flat. The shorter stitch length also prevents the stitches from showing through the seams.

Aurifil Thread and Geo Pop fabric

Click here to checkout my Aurifil thread collections – Colors, Neutrals and Variegated.

Sewing the Blocks

The block that forms the Bling quilt is actually very versatile. First take a look at the finished sewn blocks using both background colors below.

Bling Block White

Look at those beautiful seams pressed open!!

Bling Blocks

Each block in the quilt pattern uses the same background fabric and then two fun colorful prints.But look at the other options you could try! You could rotate the unit placement to create a slightly different block:

Geo Pop Bling

Or you could make the block a bit scrappier if desired.

Geo Pop Bling

However, you make it is it up to you – because you are the boss of your quilt!!

Piecing the top

Although my usual method is to sew blocks into rows, you can actually sew groups of 4 into larger blocks for easier handling.

Geo Pop Bling

Geo Pop Bling

Once the blocks are all sewn, the quilt top goes together very quickly. The pattern even includes several alternate layouts for you to try. I use my design wall to help me keep the blocks arranged just how I want them. You could also take a picture with your phone to refer to!

Geo Pop Bling

Click here for my design wall tutorial.

Quilt in Progress on Design Wall

I love quilts that show off the fabrics, and Bling was sooo fun to make! Stay tuned for the last segment where I talk about the machine quilting (my favorite part!!)

RELEVANT LINKS:

If you’ve enjoyed these helpful tips and tricks, pleas consider supporting me by purchasing my quilt patterns, fabrics, and other supplies.

The Making of Bling Quilt Part 2 of 4 – Cutting the Fabrics

I’m working on both versions of my Bling quilt at the same time, so it will be double the fun! If you remember from my last post, I’m making the same design and using the same Geo Pop fat quarters for both quilts, but one will have a white background and the other will have a black background. Any colorful prints will work as long as you have contrast between your fat quarters and background fabric.

Geo Pop by Christa Watson

Geo Pop Fat Quarter Bundle – I love working with my own fabrics!

I have more fabrics than I need since the pattern calls for just 20 fat quarters, and Geo Pop includes 25, so I’m going to save the leftovers for another project. Of course, you could use the extra fabrics for some of the blocks, since each print will be repeated in more than one block.

Washing and Starching

First, I separated the fabrics into lights and darks and then pre-washed everything on cold, using several Color Catchers in the wash. Even though this is premium quality fabric I’m working with, I still like to wash to preshrink it and wash out any excess dye so there’s no chance of bleeding when I wash the quilt later. I starched the fabrics by spraying the back side with inexpensive Faultess Premium Starch from the grocery store,  and then pressing from the front side. I repeated for both sides of the fabric.

Bling by Christa Watson of Christa Quilts

Click the image above to enlarge

Click here to purchase the Bling quilt pattern – paper version.
Click here to purchase the Bling quilt pattern – PDF version.

Cutting the Units

See the quilt pattern for specifics on cutting each of the prints.

Even though I design, test, and make all of my own quilts myself, I always write the pattern first, then follow my own instructions to make sure I haven’t missed anything as I go. I love when quilts are easy to cut out. The block units are all cut from fat quarters and the background is all cut from one fabric – light or dark.

Because I had a lot of fabric to cut, I made sure to layer 4 fat quarters at a time, and fold my background fabrics into 4 layers so I was cutting more at the same time. In a pattern like this, you don’t have to worry too much about directional prints, because they can randomly go in any direction.

Geo Pop Fabric for Bling Quilt by Christa Watson

Cut Block Pieces – with White Background
Click here to purchase yardage of Op Squares White

When dealing with large pieces of fabric, like my white or black background, I’ll cut off smaller chunks like a yard or two to work with. There’s enough so that if I lose an inch or two by squaring up the fabric, it won’t make that much of a difference.

The white version will have a scrappy binding and the black version will use the same binding as the background fabric. Here’s a tip: although the pattern calls for the standard  2 1/4″ wide strips, I actually cut mine out 2″ wide so I get a super skinny binding that’s the same side on front and back.

Geo Pop fabric for Bling quilt by Christa Watson of Christa Quilts

Cut Block Pieces – with Black Background
Click here to purchase the Bling Quilt Kit in White or Black

Now everything is ready to sew! Stay tuned for the next post where I’ll sew them up into two fun and colorful quilt tops. Click any of the links below to purchase supplies to make these quilts.

Bling Quilts with Geo Pop

RELEVANT LINKS:

The Making of Bling Quilt Part 1 of 4 – Choosing Fabrics

I enjoy sharing my process of quilt making so that you can have more success when you make your own quilts. Over the next 4 blog posts, I’ll share my process for making Bling – one of my newest patterns featuring my 4th fabric collection – Geo Pop for Benartex/Contempo. Of course it would look great in any fabrics, which is what today’s topic is all about.

Bling Quilt Pattern by Christa Watson

Bling Quilt Pattern by Christa Watson

I love this design for Bling, and especially enjoy making fat quarter friendly quilts. When choosing fabrics, the easiest way to choose colors for a successful quilt is to pick a whole bunch of fabrics that you like with the same theme or color scheme, then pair them up with a highly contrasting background fabric.

Geo Pop fabric by Christa Watson

Geo Pop fat quarters for Bling.

For example, I knew I wanted to use as many fabrics as I could in the line and most are all very bright. So bright, bold, and geometric was my fabric “theme” for this quilt.

Because there’s a lot going on with the fabrics themselves, I paired them up with the lightest fabric in the line and the darkest fabric in the line to ensure there was contrast between the main fabrics and the background. I honestly couldn’t decide which I liked better, so I decided to make both quilts!

Geo Pop fabric by Christa Quilts

I used Tiny Hex black for the darker background and Op Squares white for the lighter one.

For me, fabric selection really is that easy. I don’t get hung up too much on color theory; rather I just go with my gut feeling. After all, most of us are pretty successful choosing what to wear each day, so choosing the colors our quilts will wear isn’t that much different, right?

Geo Pop by Christa Watson

Geo Pop – 20 Colors for Bling.
Click here to get the kit of 20 FQ’s plus background fabric.

My Bling quilt pattern calls for 20 fat quarters + 4 yards of background fabric for the Twin size that I’m making. Geo Pop has 25 prints in the line including several light and dark grays. To ensure I had the most contrast possible, I pulled out the 5 light and dark grays and just use the more colorful prints. I’ll plan to use the leftovers in another project, or add them to my stash.

Geo Pop by Christa Watson

I pulled these grays out of the bundle and will use them in another project.
You could also piece them into the back of the quilt.

For the white version, I’m using some of the leftovers to make a scrappy binding that frames the quilt. For binding on the black version, I’ll use the same fabric as the background so that the the negative space goes all the way to the edges – two slightly different looks for two great quilts!

Geo Pop by Christa Watson

Geo Pop full collection – 25 colorful prints!

The first step after choosing fabrics is to prewash and starch. I always prewash any fabric that’s a fat quarter or larger. My favorite starch is inexpensive Faultless premium starch from the grocery store. To prevent flaking, I spray starch on one side of the fabric, and then iron it from the opposite side, then repeat for both sides of the fabric.

In the next post, I’ll show you these lovelies all cut and ready to piece, so stay tuned!

Relevant Links:

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